Monday, August 14, 2017

REVIEW: Sony a9 - The Ultimate Action Camera By Which All Others Will Be Judged? (Part I of II)


Sony a9 shown with the 70-200mm
I've used the kit 24-70 f/2.8 GM for my review

Henri Cartier-Bresson was famous for capturing The Decisive Moment in many of his images. When I got this camera and heard of its claim of 20fps shooting with a buffer that could hold hundreds of images, the first thing I thought was this might be a camera that helps mere mortals to increase their odds of capturing their own decisive moments in everyday life - in a high resolution image (vs video frame capture). If so, this would be a game changer.

Read on to see if this camera lives up to the hype and accomplishes that goal, or if it's yet another case of fan boy hype all over again.

Body Impressions - Finally More Buttons


Canon 6D Mark II vs Sony a9
Size compared to a DSLR (rear view)

I read a lot of stupid things on the internet, but one that really cracks me up is when people make the argument that this camera (and its siblings like the a7 and a7R II) are smaller or more compact.

Since I'm currently only shooting with a Canon 1D X Mark II, I had to use the only normal body DSLR I have on hand - a Canon 6D Mark II review unit for a comparison. I wanted to show how physically a a9 is roughly the same size as a common DSLR. This isn't a comparison of the features of these two cameras as they are totally different, but I did want to illustrate how this camera and especially the lens is very similar to what you'll get with your average DSLR.


Canon 6D Mark II vs Sony a9
Size comparison to a DSLR (top view)

One gripe I have had against the Sony a series is that their attempt to make a more compact profile just limits the better grip experience you get with a Canon or Nikon DSLR, so I do wish Sony would actually bulk them up a bit to make them more comfortable to hold with heavier lenses.

Another thing you'll notice about this Sony is that it finally gets a joystick (which sadly isn't present on the 6D Mark II for reasons that perplex me). This plus an exposure dial on top and just more buttons and knobs in general make this my favorite Sony camera body ever!

Overall, I loved this body which features:

  • A very good electronic viewfinder that shows exactly what you'll get when you shoot
  • The best coverage of AF points (especially at the edges) of any camera I've ever used
  • Excellent programming options for 8 buttons and even the joystick press event and the dial. As a result, getting this camera dialed in the way you want it without hunting through Sony's annoying menus is easily accomplished
  • An exposure compensation dial that makes it Fujifilm easy and fun to use (although it does get bumped out of its setting easier than I'd like)
  • A dial for drive modes and focus modes that Nikon lovers will feel right at home with
  • An articulating LCD screen that helps when shooting from odd angels, but sadly doesn't rotate where you can see it if you are in front of the camera doing group shots
  • Dual card slot, although one only takes SDXC II if that is your preferred format
  • and much more

Simply put, haters of Sony's annoying menus can set this camera up where they don't need to use those menus to successfully shoot out in the field. This is CRITICAL for sports photography, and something Sony has definitely done right.

Finally, Sony has made a great camera body!

Burst Mode


f/5 @ 70mm for 1/1000 sec at ISO 2000 (unedited)
Unedited single from from a series of a burst of 200+ shots

The first thing I wanted to know when I unboxed this camera was "is this burst mode for real"? I've seen other cameras that made this claim and only delivered on low resolution images. I've also seen other smoke and mirrors tricks that resulted in something that was a marketing claim, but not something that could really be used.

I built this blog because I hated all of the fan boy hype and lies in the mainstream media for  photography that made big claims that failed to materialize when I invested my money on those products.

In this video, I prove beyond a shadow of a doubt  that the Sony a9 is the real deal and it deserves credit for doing something no other camera I've ever tested has accomplished:

As a follow up to the video, you can find all 222 frames taken in the video in this gallery here. You are free to download and examine them to your hearts content, even though they are intentionally boring. :)

As I mentioned in the video, I did do RAW+JPEG on a common SDHC I 95mb/s card so your performance will only get better if you use the recommended SDXC II cards as shown above. I also didn't upload the RAW's simply due to bandwidth cost and download policies (login required) of the service where I host my images.

Burst Gallery


f/2.8 @ 70mm for 1/2000 sec at ISO 1250
(unedited)
You always get the decisive moment of any series with in 20fps burst mode

I took over 6000 shots with this camera which is extremely easy to do when you have a burst mode that is this rapid. Here's a link to a gallery that contains a random selection of some of the throw away burst sets I took while following my son around for various activities.

While I know there's some concern about the 12-bit images you get when using the electronic shutter in full burst versus the mechanical shutter in a slower burst mode (which offers 14-bit images), I can say in real world applications it doesn't make any difference. The value of getting the shot also more than makes up for the 2-bit difference that no viewer of our image will see (or should see if your capture doesn't suck).

I had a lot more bursts than these, but I only wanted to include throw away sets so readers are free to download and examine them to their hearts content.

Metering Issues - Room for Improvement


f/5 @ 70mm for 1/1000 sec at ISO 320
(unedited)
Despite doing okay for most frames, the metering was totally off for this frame
Sadly this happened more than it should for a camera of this price point

Despite advances made by Nikon and Sony in performance, one thing that keeps me on the Canon platform is the metering performance of my 1D X Mark II. If you take enough frames in a burst then odds of having a shot worth publishing is high, but having images that are way off on the exposure can lead to a lot more hassles editing or in some cases an unsalvageable shot.

In the shot above and many in this article you'll notice how the exposure is way off. Yes, I could have used exposure compensation to fix the problem, but the fact is that this is a weakness of the Sony and Nikon platforms that Canon definitely does a better job with. Like Nikon, using spot metering can help - but this camera only does spot metering from the center and not from the AF point so that's a huge fail for sports photographers who need precise metering on their target no matter what happens in the background.

If I could make only one wish to Sony for what they can fix in the next version of this camera, metering would definitely be that wish. See Canon's Evaluate Metering with an emphasis on the AF point for a case study on how metering should be done.

Swing Test

If you are a parent, you know how hard it is to get decent shots of your kids on the swing. Cameras are improving every year, but this is still a real world torture test for any camera. However, the a9 performed extremely well with hundreds of in focus images to chose from. Here's a few examples:


f/2.8 @ 70mm for 1/2000 sec at ISO 1600

A facial expression with excitement, no background obstructions and perfect focus


f/2.8 @ 70mm for 1/2000 sec at ISO 3200

Big air, great focus, and great exposure


f/2.8 @ 70mm for 1/2000 sec at ISO 1600

The perfect expression and composition for one of my favorite swing captures

If you have kids and and can afford this camera, it really is the perfect tool to get the perfect shot for just about any action your kids will do.

Handling Obstructions

The downside of photographing in public places is that someone always walks in your darn shots - especially when you are in burst mode. While it can be frustrating since you'll have editing to do, it's even more frustrating when the camera changes focus and you miss a series of shots that are impossible to capture again.

Fortunately the default settings of this camera are very good at keeping the focus point where it belongs - especially if you stick with the Flexible Spot S on your subject. Here's a few unedited examples of shots that could have been ruined, but weren't as the default AF-C settings give your original subject the priority.


f/2.8 @ 70mm for 1/2000 sec at ISO 1250

The above frame and the one before it weren't ruined by a passer by that got in the shot.
The default AF settings are designed to stay on your target and not switch when obstructed


f/2.8 @ 70mm for 1/2000 sec at ISO 1250

Lots of frames for this series, but this girl running across the frame didn't ruin any


f/2.8 @ 70mm for 1/2000 sec at ISO 1600

Even at the edges with a lot of action, the eye focus was maintained

This is great for a default setting, but if you are shooting sports like Basketball where you want the AF to change quickly to different subjects you can easily dial that in too. Sony on it's first attempt has effectively matched the Nikon D5, and one upped the D5 and 1D X Mark II by offering more focus points all the way to the edges to help increase your odds of getting the shot.

The Decisive Moment - Guaranteed

PLEASE NOTE that ALL images in this article are copyright Ron Martinsen - All Rights Reserved. You may view the associated original images while this article is open in your browser, but you must delete them when you are done. You may not print, edit, re-post, or otherwise any images in this article without written permission.

a9 LB-675-Edit
f/4 @ 70mm for 1/2000 sec at ISO 1250 (EDITED - click for the unedited original)
If you can think it, you can capture it with this camera

What I love about this camera is that when you see an opportunity where you know there's going to be a great decisive moment of the series that you want to capture, your odds of getting it are almost 100%. Even in my case where I was using the wrong lens and due to water I had to stand far back, I knew I was going to get the frame I wanted with this camera so I just planned to crop and took the shot anyway. I chose this frame, but I had tons to choose from so I could have had Kai in the water or just out of it - I had the shot no matter which artistic decision I decided to go with. That's incredibly powerful!

The rest of the shots in this section are all 100% unedited and appear exactly as they came out of the camera. Click on any to view the in-camera JPEG original file, or visit this gallery for more.


f/2.8 @ 28mm for 1/500 sec at ISO 100

I wanted a shot with a little edge flair, bouncing backlit hair and a nice shadow to the edge
Accomplished on the first attempt


f/2.8 @ 70mm for 1/1000 sec at ISO 3200

While talking to Kai I wanted to capture his overboard laugh
Accomplished on the first attempt


f/2.8 @ 59mm for 1/2000 sec at ISO 1600

I wanted to capture a great facial expression and the peace sign with his eyes in perfect focus
Accomplished on the third attempt


f/4 @ 70mm for 1/2000 sec at ISO 2000

Kai was having a happy day and I caught an expression that
However, the meter failed me but I can fix that in post-processing


f/2.8 @ 44mm for 1/2000 sec at ISO 3200

I wanted to capture an expression of unbridled enthusiasm of a boy jumping off a rock
Accomplished on the first attempt


f/2.8 @ 70mm for 1/2000 sec at ISO 2500

A big swing, parallel to the ground with a spot on smile - done
Now if that darn lady wasn't in the background - thank goodness for content aware fill :)


f/2.8 @ 70mm for 1/500 sec at ISO 1600

I wanted to capture Kai running away from his little sister - done
Accomplished on the first attempt better than I imagined with Ara appearing under his arm
in a hug/headlock type subliminal gesture


f/2.8 @ 70mm for 1/500 sec at ISO 1600

And sometimes you just get a funny shot that may not be what you are going for, but any shot that evokes an emotion response is worth keeping (My Facebook friends loved this one)

The Downside

It might surprise you that I only spent a few hours shooting with this camera over 6 separate days of reviewing.  I've been crazy busy, so I just don't get to review and blog like I used to, yet I still managed to take 6000 frames of photos worth about 60GB of disk space (excluding a lot of deleted RAW's).

Fortunately if you are using the electronic shutter, there's no fears about shortening the life of your camera like a mechanical shutter, but it can do some damage to your hard disk and backup storage in a hurry! It can also be problematic while you are on vacation, unless you buy A LOT of large capacity memory cards.

I also found it painful going through so many images in a burst that looked alike (see examples here), so often times I found myself going down to the lowest burst mode or switching to mechanical shutter just to slow things down. This is even true on my much slower Canon 1D X Mark II, as often times you simply don't need so many shots in a burst.


f/3.2 @ 70mm for 1/100 sec at ISO 640

Nice shots can still be made with AF-S single shot

That said, in practical use you'll find that the high speed electronic burst mode is fantastic when you need it - but you'd be wise to save it for only when you really need it.

Conclusion

Check back later this week when I finish up with part II where I share details about ISO performance and other findings and render my final verdict.

Where to Buy?

CLICK HERE to learn more or buy today.

Other articles you may enjoy

If you enjoyed this article, you may also enjoy these:

Disclosure

If you make a purchase using links found in this article, I may make a commission. It doesn’t cost you a penny more, but it does help to support future articles like this.

Unless noted, ALL shots in this article are unedited and come straight out of the camera as shown. In-camera JPEG's were used with in-camera Creative Style (vivid) and White Balance (shade) being leveraged to give shots an improved color over the camera default.

NOTE: This site requires cookies and uses affiliate linking to sites that use cookies.

If you enjoyed this article, please support future articles like this by making a donation or saving money by using my discount coupon codes. Either way, your support is greatly appreciated!

This blog is intended for freelance writing and sharing of opinions and is not a representative of any of the companies whose links are provided on this site.

The opinions provided are of Ron Martinsen alone and do not reflect the view of any other entity

Thursday, July 27, 2017

PREVIEW: Sony a9 Kit with Real World Shots


Sony a9 at B&H

I've been heads down working and not paying too much to the new gear coming out recently. I guess that's a testimony to how much I've loved my Canon 1D X Mark II, but wild claims about the Sony a9 caught my attention so I just started testing it last night.

Ok Sony, you now have my attention.

I'll do a real review later, but I thought I'd toss a couple images up taken from my first and  only 20 minutes using this camera with the 24-70mm kit lens which you know I don't care for much if you've read part II of my Sony a6500 review.  This copy seems to suffer from the same things I saw with other copies, so I've reached out to B&H for another lens to test for my review.

In the meantime, here are a few 100% unedited in-camera jpeg's:


f/3.5 @ 70mm for 1/800 sec at ISO 160

Even without the Eye AF turned on, the AF defaults just got this shot right



f/2.8 @ 70mm for 1/1000 sec at ISO 3200

This was part of a huge burst with Kai being silly, but it illustrated a new use for this camera to me - it's incredible burst mode is great for capturing emotions when interacting with people


f/3.5 @ 70mm for 1/800 sec at ISO 1000
This was just one frame from an astonishing burst of over 150 frames at RAW+JPEG where the electronic shutter was quiet and smoking fast. Every frame within the minimum focus distance was in focus enough to use (a few were slightly off, but not enough to be problematic)


f/3.2 @ 70mm for 1/1000 sec at ISO 5000

I desperately need a better lens, but even at 70mm with this one I was able to get a decent lock on to a bee

Conclusion

More to come in my real review, but the short story is that this camera does have a proper burst mode and very good AF so I'm looking forward to spending more time with it.

Where to Buy?

CLICK HERE to learn more or buy today.

Other articles you may enjoy

If you enjoyed this article, you may also enjoy these:

Disclosure

If you make a purchase using links found in this article, I may make a commission. It doesn’t cost you a penny more, but it does help to support future articles like this.

NOTE: This site requires cookies and uses affiliate linking to sites that use cookies.

If you enjoyed this article, please support future articles like this by making a donation or saving money by using my discount coupon codes. Either way, your support is greatly appreciated!

This blog is intended for freelance writing and sharing of opinions and is not a representative of any of the companies whose links are provided on this site.

The opinions provided are of Ron Martinsen alone and do not reflect the view of any other entity

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

ColorByte ImagePrint adds support for the Canon PRO-2000 & PRO-4000

ImagePrint 10.0.30 with support of multiple paper brands with more on the way
ImagePrint 10.0.30 with support of multiple paper brands with more on the way

My original review of ColorByte ImagePrint 10 featured support for my Canon PRO-1000, but it wasn’t until this week that they are now officially supporting the large format PRO-2000 and PRO-4000 printers.

This is a big deal for those users who want to use paper from third parties like Epson where getting Canon ICC profiles' can be tough to come by. What’s more, ImagePrint has always been highly regarded as one of the best RIP’s in the business so if you have been wanting to get more tonal range out of your new PRO series printer then this is a big deal.

Check out my original review of ColorByte ImagePrint 10 for more details about this product and why it’s profile valet and hot folders make it an invaluable part of your print workflow if you make a living off of your prints.

Where to Buy?

Purchasing this product is a little unconventional because it requires a USB dongle to be plugged into your computer when you use this software. While you can purchase direct (please tell them you came from ronmartblog.com), I've arranged a special discount that I'd recommend you take advantage of instead. Here's details:

Get 10% OFF ImagePrint

I have worked a special arrangement with ColorByte to offer you the first ever discount that was made available for a blog several years back. ColorByte is offering a 10% off discount to readers of this article when you contact JVH Technical, LLC by phone or email. You can not get this discount through the web or ColorByte directly, so you must contact JVH and you MUST mention this blog in order to get the discount.

If you have any questions or concerns about this discount program, please don’t hesitate to  contact me directly.

NOTE: This product does offer a 30 day money back guarantee as well as a free demo that will watermark your prints.

Other articles you may enjoy

If you enjoyed this article, you may also enjoy these:

Disclosure

If you make a purchase using links found in this article, I may make a commission. It doesn’t cost you a penny more, but it does help to support future articles like this.

NOTE: This site requires cookies and uses affiliate linking to sites that use cookies.

If you enjoyed this article, please support future articles like this by making a donation or saving money by using my discount coupon codes. Either way, your support is greatly appreciated!

This blog is intended for freelance writing and sharing of opinions and is not a representative of any of the companies whose links are provided on this site.

The opinions provided are of Ron Martinsen alone and do not reflect the view of any other entity

Friday, July 21, 2017

REVIEW: Red River Paper Palo Duro Etching Fine Art Paper

If you've followed along in my printing series, you know that I'm a fan of Red River Paper as a suitable alternative to more expensive papers. In fact, my article entitled Red River Paper vs Epson Papers has been one of my more popular articles because I offer my honest opinion on similarities and trade offs for going with Red River over various Epson papers. In fact, my last review entitled Red River Paper - San Gabriel Baryta Semi Gloss 2.0 I declared it just as good as the more expensive Baryta's.

It's no wonder that when Red River came out with their Palo Duro Etching paper a few months ago that they immediately reached out to me to get my thoughts on it. I printed with it and liked it right away, but I've been so crazy busy I haven't found time to write about it. Lucky for you and some insomnia after the baby waking me up in the middle of the night means that you'll finally get to hear my thoughts on this hearty fine art paper.

No Epson Comparison

While I've got a lot of Epson papers, for this review I only had 13x19 and 5x7 versions of this Red River paper. I have no other 5x7 papers to compare against and I can't scan 13x19 sheets, so this review will simply judge it on its own merit.

I will say that the closest thing I've used to this paper is the Hahnemühle German Etching, but that is still a very different paper that has no equal that I've seen (yet). I reference that paper because it's one that has a heavy texture, and that is something this paper definitely has - loads of visible texture. If that is something that bothers you, then stop reading as this isn't the right paper for you. However, if you can look at a canvas print and ignore the texture then read on.

Now the feel of this paper reminds me of the gritty feel of Epson Velvet or Epson Ultrasmooth  paper.

Tech Specs

Media: 100% cotton rag
Weight: 315gsm
Thickness: 21mil
Coated: Microporous coated one side
Color: Natural warm white tone
Surface: Heavy textured matte

Pigment Ink Users: This media is designed for Matte Black ink 

Archival Characteristics: Acid free, lignin free, OBA free, museum grade

Color Quality

Click here To get an ICC profile.

Color gamut of Palo Duro Etching (larger) vs Epson Cold Press Natural (smaller)
Color gamut of Palo Duro Etching (larger) vs Epson Cold Press Natural (smaller)

Matte black ink on fine art matte papers are always going to have a smaller color gamut than photo black on resin coated papers, but the color gamut of the Red River ICC color profile for the Epson SureColor P600 completely consumes that of the excellent Epson Cold Press Natural as shown in the graph above. What this means is that you'll get better color across the entire color spectrum using Red River's profile with this paper than you will with Epson's.

Color gamut of the Canon PRO-1000 (larger) vs Epson P600 (smaller) using the RR ICC profiles
Color gamut of the Canon PRO-1000 (larger) vs Epson P600 (smaller) using the RR ICC profiles

The Canon PRO-1000 had a wide color gamut in the ICC profile that I used for my testing

Now before the hate mail comes in, for the record here's the Epson P800 profile compared to the PRO-1000 and it's smaller too:

image

and to counteract more conspiracy theories - here's the settings I used for the above graph where the PRO-1000 shows a larger color gamut than the Epson P800:

ICC Profiles Used for Testing

Here's a scan of 5x7 print made on the Epson P600 using the Red River profile on Paulo Duro Etching and you can see the color gamut is quite impressive for a matte paper:


Full Resolution Tiff V850 Scan of a SureColor P600 Pal Duro Etching Print

It should be noted that my scanner couldn't pick up the full range of grayscale so I had to scan it twice to get the gray squares and the grayscale gradient is better in real life than what's shown in the photo. Simply put, the scan doesn't do it justice compared to what you'll see in real life.

Click here To get an ICC profile.

In The Hand

At 21mil and 315gsm, this is no flimsy paper! It's got a hearty chalky feel with a noticeable texture. It doesn't flex easily and Red River recommends using the fine art media tray, but I was able to run it through the Auto sheet feeder on my P600 without any problem, so it's not unbearably thick!

Photo Quality

The following are unedited s of actual 5x7 prints made using my P600 (my dedicated matte black printer). In the first photo, this is Epson's Advanced Black & White mode of a color photo:


Full Resolution Tiff V850 Scan of a SureColor P600 Pal Duro Etching Print
Advanced Black and White Mode (Warm | Dark setting)

It was a little darker than I hoped so some of the details were muddy in the vest, but it looks better in real life than in the scan. Here's the color print which is remarkably close in tone to what I get using photo black and luster paper:


Full Resolution Tiff V850 Scan of a SureColor P600 Pal Duro Etching Print
Photoshop Manages Color using Red River P600 ICC Profile

Here's the actual photo file used for the print  which of course has a much wider dynamic and tonal range:


Gary Original Image printed from Photoshop

In this next photo, the loss of color fidelity in the reds and yellows can be seen fairly easily - as well as the hearty texture of this paper:


Full Resolution Tiff V850 Scan of a SureColor P600 Pal Duro Etching Print using RR ICC

It should come as no surprise, this isn't a great paper for high fashion, but that's not its intent. Landscapes, abstracts, and images with lots of texture are the ones that will benefit the most. 

Model Original Image printed from Photoshop


Full Resolution Tiff V850 Scan of a SureColor P600 Pal Duro Etching Print using RR ICC

Naturally the best type of image for this type of paper is going to be a images with lots of texture, so I've printed my famous Treehouse photo using both the P600 (above) and the Canon PRO-1000 (below) using ICC profiles provided by Epson and I was quite pleased with the real world results.

The wider gamut of the Canon comes through in the form of warmer tones and deeper blacks. In real life under a light box in ideal lighting conditions, the Canon really shines but in normal tungsten lighting conditions the Epson print doesn't feel as dark so it is easier to see some of the detail in the shadows.  Simply put, both look good but if you have great lighting conditions then the Canon will produce the more visually pleasing print.


Full Resolution Tiff V850 Scan of a Canon PRO-1000 Pal Duro Etching Print using RR ICC

Epson Driver Settings (Windows)

For Epson SureColor printers, the driver will be basically the same so here's the settings I chose:

Epson SureColor Settings on Windows for Red River Palo Duro Etching

I did Cold Press Natural so I could use the sheet feeder, despite Red River's recommendation for using Velvet because 5x7 paper can't be used for the manual feeder (required for Velvet).

No matter what paper you use, you have to set Paper Thickness to 5 in Paper Config(uration):

Epson P600 Paper Configuration for Red River Palo Duro Etching

In all of my testing, I had no issues with the paper being scratched - even when I forgot the paper thickness set to 2. You'll also noticed below that I did LEVEL 4 (1440x1440 dpi) per Red River's guidance. 1440 does variable size dots vs 2880 which uses fixed size, so the lower resolution can still result in higher quality results which was my observation with this paper. As a result, I agree with Red River's recommendations:

Epson SureColor Settings on Windows - Summary Red River Palo Duro Etching

In Photoshop I chose to do Perceptual rendering intent (despite my normal preference for Relative Colormetric) for the best results:

Epson SureColor P600 Photoshop Settings Red River Palo Duro Etching

Mac settings look different, but the values are all the same so what you see here - despite looking very different - still applies to the Mac.

Canon PRO-1000 Settings (Windows)

For the Cano - PRO-1000 I chose Heavyweight Fine Art Paper so I could use the Rear Tray (for the same reason as above for Epson - you have to do this with 5x7 paper). I also chose the highest quality which with the optional XPS (non-default for Canon) driver can result in better color fidelity:

Canon PRO-1000 XPS Driver Settings (Windows) for Red River Palo Duro Etching

On this page the key thing to remember is to click Advanced Settings and Color Intensity to Manual (then click Set):

Canon PRO-1000 XPS Driver Main Settings (Windows) for Red River Palo Duro Etching

For color you want None so Photoshop can apply the ICC profile without double color management:

Canon PRO-1000 XPS Driver Manul Color Adjustment Matching for Red River Palo Duro Etching

For Advanced Settings you have to set Print Head Height to "Avoid Paper Abrasion" which just means this is thick paper:

Canon PRO-1000 XPS Driver Paper Detailed Settings for Red River Palo Duro Etching

Canon PRO-1000 Photoshop Settings for Red River Palo Duro Etching

Conclusion

This paper feels substantial in the hand with a hearty texture so some will perceive that as high quality and others will be think ugh, that's too chalky for me. However, that's the art of choosing the right paper for the right photo. When paired with a texture heavy image like the treehouse shot, it's a great choice that feels good in the hand.

This paper has the fine art "special" feel that separates it from your cheapo prints, so even a novice will know that this wasn't printed at your local discount warehouse or volume online print service. When commanding a premium price for your images, this is important so that's where paper like this really pays for itself!

Red River has done a good job of offering a museum quality paper at a reasonable price with excellent ICC profiles. As a result, this paper is an easy one to recommend to both Canon and Epson fine art printer users.

Where to Buy?

CLICK HERE to learn more or buy today.

Photographer's Choice Sample Kit Special Offer

Other articles you may enjoy

If you enjoyed this article, you may also enjoy these:

Disclosure

If you make a purchase using links found in this article, I may make a commission. It doesn’t cost you a penny more, but it does help to support future articles like this.

NOTE: This site requires cookies and uses affiliate linking to sites that use cookies.

If you enjoyed this article, please support future articles like this by making a donation or saving money by using my discount coupon codes. Either way, your support is greatly appreciated!

This blog is intended for freelance writing and sharing of opinions and is not a representative of any of the companies whose links are provided on this site.

The opinions provided are of Ron Martinsen alone and do not reflect the view of any other entity