Monday, January 3, 2011

Printing 101: Part IV – Paper & Ink

Removed - a new edition is coming later this year. See http://www.ronmartblog.com/2011/03/trey-ratcliffs-flatbookscom-ron.html for more details

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4 comments:

Neil said...

With regard to canvas, I think the biggest reason to do it is that it sells because it is inexpensive. The vast majority of consumers just want somethign that is "over the couch" sized. They don't care about fine art this or permanence that. They care about size and price. You simply can't do an "over the couch" sized print and sell it framed under plexiglass for anything approaching reasonable cost for most consumers. With canvas you can.

There is a fantastic segment on this in the Luminous Landscape Video Journal #19 (http://www.ronmartblog.com/2011/01/printing-101-part-iv-paper-ink.html). Michael interviews Andrew Collette who makes his living selling photos, both in a retail gallery and through trade shows to interior designers. He switched completely to canvas, and goes into detail on why.

I agree with you that printing on anything other than canvas rolls is a useless endeavour :)

Anonymous said...

The canvas print is inexpensive as Neil mentioned, but also durable. For a properly coated canvas, take some windex, squirt it down, and clean.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for your excellent work on this website.

I just wanted to point out a typo on this page: "mil is just the thickness of the paper in millimeters".

The unit "mil" in this context actually refers to milli-INCHES... otherwise a 15 "mil" thick paper such as Museo Portfolio Rag would be over half an inch thick!


Cheers,

Dave

Ron Martinsen said...

Thanks for the note about Mil. I've actually had someone else point that one out and it's been on my todo list ot correct it.

Thank you - I've added a reminder to myself to do that tonight.